This is a rockin new feature of the TFF site if I do say so myself.
via tribecafilm:

Learn Wish List 101 For TFF 2014
With your Tribeca Wish List, you’ll be able to organize and purchase tickets for your must-see films of the Festival and stay one step ahead of the crowds.

This is a rockin new feature of the TFF site if I do say so myself.

via tribecafilm:

Learn Wish List 101 For TFF 2014

With your Tribeca Wish List, you’ll be able to organize and purchase tickets for your must-see films of the Festival and stay one step ahead of the crowds.

Just like Nasty Nas spits is…

via tribecafilm:

Get Your TFF 2014 Ticket Packages Before The Sale Ends on April 1st

Lo (at Pieces Bar)

Lo (at Pieces Bar)

Passes and Packages are on sale now for the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival #FilmFestivalsAreTheOriginalBingeWatching #TheNewRulesofFilm 

via tribecafilm:

Lights, camera, tickets!

2014 Tribeca Film Festival Passes & Ticket Packages are now on sale for American Express® Card Members.

I always thought there was no better actor to portray my family’s namesake on screen than Harold Ramis as Dr. Egon Spengler. The book-end to Bill Murray’s wild Dr. Venkman was smart, serious, sweet and played perfectly straight by the talented actor.  It showed that this great talent was as keen an actor as he was a writer and director.  The true triple threat that was so rare in filmmaking. 

Sure it was spelled with an e instead of an a, but that didn’t stop hundreds of people through my life commenting, “oh, like the guy in Ghostbusters”, after they heard my last name mentioned. The really cool thing was that the real Harold Ramis looked like the doppelgänger to my midwest born-and-raised father.  

In "As Good As It Gets" he played another Doctor, the comforting Dr. Bettes who appears at the home of Helen Hunt’s family as a gift from Melvin Udall. He sits in her kitchen and walks through how he’s gonna help make her son feel better.  He talks about allergy issues that I heard my father mention growing up and has a calming power over the worried mother and daughter that made it seem like everything was all gonna be all right. 

Every detail about the character was personified in my own father. A Doctor as well (an Allergist in fact) I remember watching it for the first time and starting to tear up thinking of him and how this man was able to portray someone like him in such a real way. The physical similarities only made it closer to home but it was the personality and warmth that was so clearly communicated.  

I didn’t know the man, but you could tell he was a special, caring person. I’m sure he’s laughing and smiling wherever he is. Excuse me, I’m gonna go give my dad a call. 

I always thought there was no better actor to portray my family’s namesake on screen than Harold Ramis as Dr. Egon Spengler. The book-end to Bill Murray’s wild Dr. Venkman was smart, serious, sweet and played perfectly straight by the talented actor.  It showed that this great talent was as keen an actor as he was a writer and director.  The true triple threat that was so rare in filmmaking. 

Sure it was spelled with an e instead of an a, but that didn’t stop hundreds of people through my life commenting, “oh, like the guy in Ghostbusters”, after they heard my last name mentioned. The really cool thing was that the real Harold Ramis looked like the doppelgänger to my midwest born-and-raised father.  

In "As Good As It Gets" he played another Doctor, the comforting Dr. Bettes who appears at the home of Helen Hunt’s family as a gift from Melvin Udall. He sits in her kitchen and walks through how he’s gonna help make her son feel better.  He talks about allergy issues that I heard my father mention growing up and has a calming power over the worried mother and daughter that made it seem like everything was all gonna be all right. 

Every detail about the character was personified in my own father. A Doctor as well (an Allergist in fact) I remember watching it for the first time and starting to tear up thinking of him and how this man was able to portray someone like him in such a real way. The physical similarities only made it closer to home but it was the personality and warmth that was so clearly communicated.  

I didn’t know the man, but you could tell he was a special, caring person. I’m sure he’s laughing and smiling wherever he is. Excuse me, I’m gonna go give my dad a call. 

Nice work from the team on the new Tribeca site that launched yesterday. Here’s what you’ll see:
Overhauled design & user experience
Looks saweet on mobile
Dynamic menu system gets u everywhere fast
Easier to find content with expanded categories
Fast access to the key Tribeca Film Festival stuff like tickets and schedule w/ the ever-present “Survival Guide” (look for the life preserver).
Find out what films we have In Theaters and On-Demand now

Nice work from the team on the new Tribeca site that launched yesterday. Here’s what you’ll see:

  • Overhauled design & user experience
  • Looks saweet on mobile
  • Dynamic menu system gets u everywhere fast
  • Easier to find content with expanded categories
  • Fast access to the key Tribeca Film Festival stuff like tickets and schedule w/ the ever-present “Survival Guide” (look for the life preserver).
  • Find out what films we have In Theaters and On-Demand now

tribecafilm:

It’s all coming together.

#tbt April 2012;

#tbt April 2012;

Awesome - was just thinking of this technique today b/c there are some fantastic lenticular paintings in the offices of the Hearst building.

via strle:

Lenticular Paintings by Rafaël Rozendaal

Two of these are mine. I love them so much. 

If you are in New York City between now and January 18th, you should stop by the Postmasters in Tribeca to see this show. The work is incredible.

The movies aren’t dead, they ain’t even left the house. The problem is that making the kinds of movies that would wake them up and check on their pulse has gone out of fashion. TV is hardly the better medium, it’s just been using what it has better than its rival. How long this will go on is anyone’s guess.

Kenneth Turan in the LA Times